"Around 1994, [they] were actually thinking Zeiss should no longer manufacture fluorescence microscopes."

- Martin Chalfie, Nobel Laureate for the discovery of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP)

"Around 1994, [they] were actually thinking Zeiss should no longer manufacture fluorescence microscopes."

- Martin Chalfie, Nobel Laureate for the discovery of Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP)

i-heart-histo:

Once upon a slide…the first microbiology book for 5 year olds!

At last! No more bed time fairy tales about damsels in distress, princesses in pink and knights in white shining armor.

Move over Disney. This is a world we should be opening our kids up to. Steeped in reality. A world 1000x more exciting than those lands too far far far away, and it is all playing out under our very noses, inside our refrigerators, outside our back doors and throughout our own bodies.

Thank you to Nicola Davies (author) and Emily Sutton (illustrator) for this beautiful non-fiction children’s book that introduces young readers to microscopy.

I can’t wait to buy this for my nieces.

Let me know if you need help with the histological sequel ;)

i-heart-histo

Sources:

View more of Emily’s beautiful artwork at her website

Find out more about award winning author Nicola at her blog/website

Images and book (ISBN:1406341045) seen at amazon.com and via Walker Books 

i-heart-histo, Can’t wait to have nieces to buy this for! Can you start becoming a good uncle too early?

(via i-heart-histo)

A dose of colour on a grey day #JohnStPasture #NYC

Focus #WarmNightsBrightLights #nyc

Focus #WarmNightsBrightLights #nyc

Night 3 #WarmNightsBrightLights

Night 3 #WarmNightsBrightLights

asapscience:

Long exposure photo of a helicopter landing reveals the physics of the vehicle. 
via My Modern Met

asapscience:

Long exposure photo of a helicopter landing reveals the physics of the vehicle. 

via My Modern Met

biomorphosis:

Sapphirina copepod, a.k.a. "sea sapphire" is a tiny shrimp like crustacean that makes up the bottom of the food chain. The microscopic layers of crystal plates inside their cells catch light and reflect back different hues, from bright gold to deep blue that resembles like a gem. 

When they’re abundant near the water’s surface the sea shimmers like diamonds falling from the sky. Japanese name this kind of water, “tama-mizu”, jeweled water. Combine this nifty trick with the sea sapphire’s impressively transparent body, and you have an animal as radiant as a star in one moment, and invisible in the next.

Perspective

skunkbear:

WHEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE!

I was recently reminded how much I still enjoy this endlessly zooming video from 1968, “Powers of Ten”:

You’ve got to watch the video for the narration and the kickin’ soundtrack. For a modern, interactive take, check out “The Scale of the Universe" by Cary Huang. Get some perspective!

My favourite region of the planet, Bryce Canyon in Utah’s southern canyon lands <3

 wnycradiolab:

theangelofhistory:

Bryce Canyon, Utah.

From the AMNH lantern slide collection.

One of my favourite albums right now set to an artist (Linden Gledhill) I’ve come across a few times in the last couple days for his science communication = bliss.